There are a lot of options to improve the visual appearance of a house, and landscaping is one of the first that many people look to for fast, pleasing results. When beginning your search for landscaping improvements, there are some tips that help you get started on the right track for big and beautiful results.

Have a plan, or make one.

Manicured Home and Yard

There are as many ways to plan a landscape as there are people who own houses. Whether you want to focus on a particular type or variety of plant, or a color scheme, or an overall themed-look, you just need to make a decision so you can run with it. If you have children, you can get them involved. What are your favorite colors? For families with little girls, maybe pink and purple is a good choice. For families with little boys, maybe the primary colors would be a great option. For a more sedate look that still stands out, maybe a grey and white scheme would look fantastic while retaining a certain elegance and dignity. Whatever the overall plan, just have a plan to start with.

Reach higher, vertically speaking.

Whether we are talking about trellising that you already have, but haven’t used, or just one wall of your house that could use a little natural TLC, vertical growing is something that instantly adds a rustic, elegant charm to any home. Think of it as painting a mural in living color. Some great options, which come in a variety of colors, include moonflowers and morning glories and climbing jasmines. Be aware that these also make great container plants, and while they can become rather invasive, keeping them in containers minimizes the chances of the plants making a permanent residence and spreading roots. There are also climbing options for locations that see more shade than sun. A popular favorite is the Lenten Rose, or any of the Helleborus plant family. These plants produce a stunning array of blooms, often multicolored petals on the same flower, and will thrive along a shady wall, or under the spreading boughs of a shade tree. Climbing plants, or even a pyramid of planters along one side of the patio provide a unique look to an otherwise bland view.

Go bold with bright colors.

House for Sale Real Estate

There are many options for homeowners looking for that spark, that pop, that can only come from a blast of blooming plants in spring, summer, and fall. One favorite for easy color is Salvia. The vivid green of the foliage and lanky stalks of violet blooms attract beneficial insects and pollinators like a lightning rod in a storm. Another great find is snapdragons. They come in almost every color under the sun, including bright hot pink, pastel blue, and crimson like your mother-in-law’s favorite lipstick.

Sorry, was that out loud?

Anyway, the point is, blooming plants are available for every region, every season, and ever spot in your lawn and garden. There is not a single reason why every home can’t have a lawn full of blooms every year, or even every day of the year! For ideas on plants that will not just grow, but thrive in your area, your local Agriculture Co-op or Extension Services Office usually has buckets of information to provide to savvy homeowners like you.

Get set for the long haul.

While we all love color, not all of us love getting our hands dirty to change our plantscape every year. An option for the one-and-done type of gardener or landscaper is a perennial garden. Perennials bloom year after year, and some can last decades! The trick to making perennials work in your yard is finding the varieties that work well with your soil type, climate, and habits. Some people save even more money by starting earlier, and growing their perennials from seed directly. Again, natives to your area are the way to go if you want to save a few bucks and start your plant-babies from seed. Perennials provide proven results year after year, and your lawn can be talk of the town with a few native beauties thrown into the mix!

When in doubt, consult a garden services specialist, or the all-mighty Google. Start with a plan, and watch your dreams grow bigger than a century-old oak.